Picture Book Poetry Party!

A Party with a Purpose: sharing Poems and Picture-Books; practicing public speaking; partaking in portions of science that are enjoyably palatable! These are some of the ingredients in a Picture-Book Poetry Party.

“We’re giving family audiences enjoyable free entertainment, where they learn some science almost by accident, providing participating students with unique high-achieving opportunities plus, it’s a wonderful way to befriend and showcase other fabulous children’s authors from our region.”

This year’s star is Deanna Henderson of Minibeast Wildlife fame. She will be reading her Picture-Book “There’s a Zoo in my Backyard” and sharing some of her writing journey. This will be the fifth annual Poetry Party hosted by Science Rhymes poet Celia Berrell.

Celia’s Poetry Parties were inspired by a SCBWI suggestion of encouraging children’s authors and illustrators to accomplish projects together. Her first feature authors – Diane Finlay, Jacque Duffy and Trudie Trewin – were all fellow SCBWI members.

“It helps us to promote ourselves, our books and the SCBWI profile within our region” adds Celia.

http://www.sciencerhymes.com.au/picture-book-poetry-party-2018.html

2018 Poetry Party Poster

 

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Small Moments Make Your Story Big

Valuable advice and summation of what it takes to ‘keep it simple’ yet relevant and powerful in the art of storytelling. Something I sometimes struggle with but endeavour to achieve in picture book writing.

Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

“A big story is about a small moment.” ~Matthew Dicks

Think about that for a moment (not a small one).

Every book you have ever read is about a small moment—an epiphany when a character realizes an emotional truth with complete clarity.

Let me provide examples:

THE MONSTORE is not just about a store that sells monsters. It’s about a brother and sister who learn to appreciate one another and cooperate.

7 ATE 9 is about number 9 realizing his worth.

LITTLE RED GLIDING HOOD is about not judging someone before you get to know them.

Before I read Matthew Dicks’ STORYWORTHY, I used to phrase this “small moment” concept differently. I would explain that a story, especially a picture book, required an emotional core. Now I realize that is an amorphous blob of a statement.

In other words, not very helpful.

Likewise, if I told you my manuscript…

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June Perkins is in Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art !

Here’s some great news and a talk in October by one of our Brisbane SCBWI members – Dr June Perkins!

Congratulations June!!

Here’s a little sneak peak… https://ripplepoetry.wordpress.com/2018/09/02/wordsandpictures/

Facebook event : Words and Pictures https://www.facebook.com/events/1847659181937749/

 
More info

 

QAGOMA Words & Pictures Spring 2018-2-page-001

SCBWI Sunshine Coast Round-up

As I attend our third sub-branch SCBWI meeting for the Sunshine Coast, I am reminded yet again at how fortunate we are to be a part of such a talented and generous community. We begin our meeting by introducing ourselves, our latest projects and discuss the many trials and tribulations of the creative life. I am sure we can all relate to everyone’s experiences, whether it be the challenge of balancing writing time with family, excitement around an up-coming New York writing conference, and Peter Carnavas’s thrilling CBCA 2018 nomination.

SCBWI Sunny Coast

After our introductions, Taryn Bashford guides us through the ins and outs of creating an author platform, focusing particularly on website development, social media and how important it is to maintain a consistent and engaging online presence. I am always amazed at the expertise within our group, not only on writing, but across the wide skill set that is required to be a children’s author.

The Harper Effect Taryn Bashford

Next Margaret Gibbs waves her polished teachers wand by providing us with an in-depth insight of what teachers are looking for in an author visit. Her unique expertise was invaluable as she communicated the necessity to inspire, enlighten and motivate children. Marg also gave us five key points to communicate to the children;

  • ‘Ideas come from everywhere.’
  • ‘Share your ideas with others.’
  • ‘Reading is essential.’
  • ‘Don’t give up.’
  • ‘You need to edit and re-edit.’

Marg Gibbs

Finally, Peter Carnavas shared his experience with UQP in editing his children’s novel The Elephant. It was fascinating to hear how The Elephant was originally a versus novel and then gradually took its current format after structural edits. We heard how Peter altered his writing style by describing gestures and expressions more that he normally would have for picture books and how he was guided to avoid unintended rhymes. Peter also shared specific points that he focused on during his editorial process, such as simplifying seemingly uncomplicated words, like changing the word ‘beneath’ to ‘under,’ and always making sure there is a strong underlying ‘point’ to your story.

Peter Carnavas

Thank you so much to Ali Stegart for your organising and Renee Irving-Lee for arranging the lovely room. I would whole-heartedly recommend SCBWI members to attend our informative and supportive community meetings. We will have our Queensland SCBWI leader Sheryl Gwyther at our final meeting for the year on Sunday 28th October from 2.30 – 4.30. (Venue to be confirmed.)

SCBWI Queensland blogsite is up and running again

Hello readers! We’re pleased to announce that SCBWI Queensland now has an outlet for news, blog articles, illustrating and writing advice … our own updated blog site. Watch out for updating and modernising because we have a BlogMaster! SCBWI Qld member, Giuseppe Poli has stepped into the role. 

Giuseppe, one of our fab illustrator/authors, will co-ordinate the posts we hope to share. We also have a number of Official Bloggers who’ll add to the material we’ll post. They include Dimity Powell, Angela Sunde, Ann Harth, Alison Stegert, Emma Middleton, Jacqui Halpin and myself, Sheryl Gwyther (SCBWI ARA).

If you have an article or a link you think others will enjoy, send it to our Queensland SCBWI website, along with your name, your favoured genre etc, and what the link is about. … queensland@scbwiaustralianz.com

The importance of illustrations in picture books – a guest post by Emma Middleton – Readilearn

SCBWI success story, Emma Middleton​ takes a moment to illustrate the importance of pictures in picture books! #illustratorinterview #illustration #kidslit #picturebooks #readilearn #teachingresources Norah Colvin​ #thefixitman #NickyJohston

Norah Colvin

This week I have great pleasure in introducing you to Emma Middleton who is here to discuss illustrations in picture books as tools for analysis, enjoyment and interpretation.

Emma is a picture book author, illustrator, children’s performer and former ballerina who lives near Noosa, Queensland. After a career in performing arts, during which time she danced for the Vienna Ballet, she returned to Australia to direct and teach at The Brighton Dance Academy.

Emma retired from teaching dance to follow her passion for picture books by creating stories that will enhance a child’s sense of wonder, delight and unlimited possibility. Emma is the author of companion picture books The Lion in our Living Room and The Bear in our Backyard.

Welcome to readilearn, Emma. Over to you.

Illustrations in picture books can be an excellent tool for developing children’s analytical and interpretative skills, as well as enhancing their enjoyment…

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When Self-Doubt Kills Productivity.

Good to know we are never alone in spite of our words sometimes making us feel that way. This assessment of our writerly demises is so spot on, it both hurts and uplifts.

Debbie Johansson

Recently, I’d been struck with a wave of self-doubt. As I worked on my re-writes, it began as a trickle; my first six chapters were a complete mess and felt I couldn’t continue until they were fixed. That was my internal editor speaking to me and as they kicked in; the self-doubt began to swirl around me until it stopped me in my tracks. I was doing nothing more than going around in circles. It was then that I stepped away from the keyboard.

It was also around this time that I was reading up on self-publishing. This coincided with reading about the odds of author success. I always knew that going down the road to self-publishing was not going to be easy, but I guess the reality of it all really hit home.

I’d been dealt a blow from the stick of truth (thanks South Park ;)…

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