‘A PERFECT SUBMISSION’ – SCBWI Qld P.D. #1

scbwi qld

SCBWI Queensland Professional Development 2013 #1

A PERFECT SUBMISSION – from an editor’s eye. Perfecting your manuscript submissions. (Bring along the first chapter of your ms to work on).

Presenter: LEONIE TYLE, well-respected editor and former publisher at University of Qld Press and Woolshed Press, Random House.

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Plus: A video presentation for illustratorsWhat do I charge for my work? Finding the right price to suit you and your buyer can be difficult. This 23 min. video provides some thought-provoking answers. A short discussion will follow.

When: Sunday January 20th  @ 10.30am (sharp) – 12.45.

 Where: Queensland Writers Centre meeting room, Level 2, State Library of Queensland, South Brisbane.

RSVP for catering purposes by 18th January to Sheryl G

 Cost: $15 (SCBWI members)  $20 (non-members)

Includes morning tea, smoko, elevenses, elva-kaffe, konkelstik, las onces, little lunch or whatever takes your fancy.

Reading, Running and Realising Books are the Real Treasure!

Do you want your kids to be excited about books? Do you want your kids to spend more time playing outside?

Are you looking for something different for your kids to do so that they’ll look back in years to come and think of it as one of the really fun things they did as a family when they were young and maybe even carry on the tradition?

If you’ve answered yes to all the above then maybe you’ll be interested in organising a Book Sleuthing Treasure Hunt for your own children and invite all the others in the street or neighbourhood to join in. It’s also perfect for a children’s party or a school class.

How to Organise a Treasure Hunt where Books hold all the Answers.

Devised by Prue Mason with lots of help from Jill Morris, Judy Paulson, Gillian Leigh and Sue Collaro.

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This activity can be for as little as two children but definitely the more the merrier as they can be divided into two teams.

What you need:

1. At least two treasure hunters ore more divided into two teams – to make it simple make one the gold team and the other the silver team with each having a team leader.

2. Gold and silver medallions for the participants (cut out of cardboard and tied around the neck with string)

3. 20 books

4. 20 clues (these can be put inside gold or silver tins or boxes before they are hidden)

5.  20 signposts to mark the areas where the clues are hidden

6.  2 maps (if you’re an illustrator you can make your own but for others there are great treasure hunt maps that can be downloaded and from the internet and adapted)

7. 2 clipboards

8. 2 instruction poems

9.  2 answer sheets marked from 1 -10 so the hunters can mark each letter in right order as they find them and which will then spell out a full ten letter word. This sheet also needs to have space for the hunters to write their definition for the ten letter word they uncover.

10. 2 sealed envelopes with instructions on how to find the edible treasure

11. 2 treasure chests full of edible treasure

12. At least an hour before hand to set up the signposts, clues and books.

What you do:

1. Draw 2 maps of the area where the clues are to be hidden.

2. Give names to 20 places where you want to hide the clues, linking them to the stories and characters in the books you’re using.

3. Make signposts using these names. Mark these with gold or silver and put these in the ground around where the clue from each book is to be hidden.

4. Divide the books into two groups and mark each map with 10 hiding places, making sure they are marked 1-10 so the hunters find each clue in the right order.

5. Think of two ten letter words – one word for each team and using the first ten books find one letter inside each book to make up the ten letter word. e.g. If looking for a letter ‘e,’ this might be found in book titled: Camel Rider on Page 20, line 4, word 6, letter 2. These instructions will then be the clue. It’s important the hunters find each clue in the right order to make up the word.

6. Repeat this with the other ten books to create the second 10 letter word

7. Hide the clues in the sign-posted places making sure you keep the two lots of 10 clues separate. The paper clues can be hidden inside small boxes or cylinders that can be painted either gold or silver.

8.  Keep the books in two separate baskets so the hunters can return to them each time they find a clue. They will need to look through the book for the answer that they then mark on the answer sheets provided.

9. When each team has found all the clues and spelled out their word they must think of a definition for the word. They don’t need to know what the word means but be encouraged to use their imagination.

10. When they have met this final challenge they can be handed the sealed envelope with the final clue that will lead to the edible treasure

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Poem to start the treasure hunt:

Golden/Silver Treasure hunting Team
It is time to test your sleuthing skills
And join the treasure hunt that’s full of thrills
Read these words most carefully
For it tells you what your team’s tasks will be.

A special map will set you on the track
for in this park/garden you will see
Signposts that will be the key
Start at one and end at ten
Seek the golden/silver tins for each one holds a clue
But it is the books that will find the true answers for you.

All ten letters you must get
This will give you the full set
That make a word that’s weird but fun.
The challenge is to find meaning for this one
And then there is one final test
And an edible treasure to end your quest.
So off you go and find your first clue.
good luck to each one of you!

Poem to end the treasure hunt:

Look to the nearest, biggest, greenest tree
From this take steps three by three
Towards a …. (an obvious place such as a wall, window, garden bed etc.
Then in the ground
Dig deeply until the treasure is found.

If all this sounds like lots of work that’s because it is but to see children rushing around and having fun with books does make all that organising worth it.

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To enter writing competitions or not? That is the question….

Another post from Taryn Bashford, SCBWI Qld member.

Do you face this dilemma? Trying to get novels published and spending too much spare time wondering if one should enter competitions?  Is this a useful way to spend one’s writing time or is it a hurdle to distract from writing a new novel? Another delaying tactic? 

I’m aware how writers can get lost and take refuge in research for their books and delay actually writing the novel itself.  Yet everyone says if you win a competition it’s great to add to your CV; yet it distracts me from writing my novel – and so the vicious circle develops.

Having recently come to my own conclusion about this question, I thought I’d share it with you. 

I decided to enter a few competitions and so spent some time letting my mind wander and hover over new story ideas and concepts, new characters and their friends, new beginnings and new endings. It became a great way to exercise the imagination, to flex that writing muscle in the brain and free my mind to write something that wasn’t going to become a year-long project. I was able to experiment, play with tenses, with dialogue and different endings without the worry that if I did a re-write, there were 30,000 words or more to go through. This ability to freely experiment was of benefit to me as I have learnt which styles work for me. 

Taryn Bashford

The most surprising benefit, though, was it lead to a concept for my next novel. As I was writing and formulating the characters and plot for a 4,000 word short story competition, my mind grabbed the idea and ran away with it. I couldn’t stop it flying off on different tangents, collecting new chapters, new characters, new tension and climaxing moments and suddenly I had a whole YA novel in my head itching to be written.

 So I entered the competition but whilst I await the results I have a whole new novel to write. 

The 2012 Byron Bay Writers Festival … impressions from a children’s writer

SCBWI Qld author and blogger, Taryn Bashford blogs on her experiences at the recent Annual Byron Bay Writers Festival. Visit her blog or website to find out more about Taryn.

Beautiful Byron Bay (image courtesy of the Byron Bay Community Markets)

Firstly, I went along as a volunteer and I highly recommend doing this if you want to save the entry fee because it’s lots of fun, you meet lots of people and you feel like you’re a real part of the Festival. I was a host and had 8 writers assigned to me (I was like their PA for a day). Just contact them via the website.

Anyhow, this was my first visit and the general impression was that the visitors loved it, thought there was a good breadth of topics and some great authors there. I was surprised at the number of children and YA authors in attendance; Morris Gleiztman, Andy Griffiths, Isobelle Carmody, Shamini Flint and Sarah Brennan to name a few.

From the standpoint of a writer though, there was very little there in terms of learning your craft. The only session catering for us writers was the pitch session (45 mins for 6 pre-determined people to do a 5 min pitch) but this was interesting as ever with publishers from Harper Collins and Harlequin Teen.

I have to say the most exciting day for me was the Sunday as it was Children’s Day. To see a whole marquee full of 5 to 14 year olds, all there to listen to authors, buy their books and get them autographed, was very exciting. We should thank these authors for attending because they are creating so much interest in reading books and that will certainly benefit those of us wishing to publish in this market – and their own sales of course!

All in all, a great venue, some brilliant authors to talk to and listen to but more geared to readers than writers.

EXHIBITION: JOURNEY OF A BOOK: Celebrating books-from idea to publication

A SPECIAL EXHIBITION at the Brisbane Square Library, George St, Brisbane city Level 2 … 13th July to August 30th

Showcasing the work of many of Queensland Children’s Authors and Illustrators – organised by the SCBWI Qld team and the Brisbane City Council events organiser, Michelle Richards.

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The Exhibition launch was held on Friday 13th July 2012 and will run until the end of August. Many supporters turned up to the launch and celebrated with the authors and illustrators.

The exhibition was launched by Jenny Stubbs, organiser of the Ipswich Children’s Literary Festival, co-ordinate the Ipswich District Teacher-Librarian Network, president of Book Links Qld and passionate supporter of children’s books and their creators.

Authors’ work is displayed in individual glass cases, and illustrators’ framed images hang on large wall spaces.

Each exhibit demonstrates how authors create books – from the first glimmer of an idea to the finished product. They feature artifacts, photographs, images, first drafts, final manuscripts and the book itself.

Featured authors:

David McRobbie – Vinnie’s War

Josie Montano – Little Penguin

Judy Paulson – Baby Tawnies

Kim Michelle Toft – Recipe for Perfect Planet Pie

Nette Hilton – The Web

Tina Marie Clark – African Orphans

Peter Taylor – Calligraphy

Katherine Battersby – two Squish Rabbit books

Pam Rushby – The Horses Didn’t Come Home

Sheryl Gwyther – Secrets of Eromanga

Jennifer Poulter – Mending Lucille

Prue Mason – Camel Rider

Angela Sunde – Pond Magic

Featured Illustrator:

Peter Allert

Lynn Priestley

Anil Tortop

Ozan Tortop

Lynelle Westlake